Nova Scotia Landlords Association


Welcome to the NSLA for Small Business Landlords

The Nova Scotia Landlords Association (NSLA) and its sister organization The Canada Landlords Association (CLA) are leading provincial and national organizations for private small residential landlords. We provide a unified voice for private landlords and promote and protect landlord interests to national and local government.

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  • Get advice from experienced landlords
  • Learn how the Landlord and Tenant Board works
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  • Take part in landlord activities, social events.
  • A chance to "get involved!"

Nova Scotia Landlords & Tenants Working Together

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We Invite Nova Scotia Tenants To Join Us In An Important Conversation On How To Improve the Rental Industry

Experienced and successful Nova Scotia landlords know one of the keys to success is to find good paying tenants. A good tenant will pay the rent on time and treat both the rental property and the landlord with respect. While many people think all landlords are rich the reality is very different.

Nova Scotia And Bad Tenants

Nova Scotia landlords do not have it easy at all! We aren’t big corporations with economies of scale, expensive lawyers on retainer and millions on the bank. We have a lot of challenges trying to run our rental businesses. Not only do we have to face tenants who abuse the system we also have to worry about new changes such as how legal marijuana will impact our rental properties.

Good Tenants

We also know there are lots of good hard-working and honest renters out there. These are people who do treat their landlord and rental with respect on pay on time and respect the lease.  These are tenants who desire there to be more high quality affordable housing for rent and don’t want those bad tenants to get landlords to leave the business, leaving less rentals on the market.

Good Landlords & Good Tenants, Working Together!

Good Nova Scotia landlords are looking to rent to good tenants and good Saskatchewan tenants want to rent from good landlords. So how about this? Let’s all work together as positive forces of good and improve the Nova Scotia rental industry!

Instead Of Confrontation & Blaming We Want Cooperation And Communication

We are inviting good Nova Scotia tenants to join us in the following ways to help improve our situation:

Share Your Stories and Opinions With Us

Share your experiences renting in Nova Scotia and you can help other tenants, landlords and educate people and play a role in improving the Nova Scotia rental industry.

Become A Tenant Community Leader for the Nova Scotia Tenant Forum 

We are looking for 5 experienced Nova Scotia tenants to help run our Tenant forum and make it as helpful as possible for other Nova Scotia tenants to learn from.  As Tenant Community Leader who will be able to invite other verified tenants to join our forum to help educate the community. The goal is to create a sophisticated place for tenants to chat with each other.

Provide Us With Your Ideas for Policy Changes

Do you think some things need to change in Nova Scotia? We invite you to share your policy ideas with us.

Nova Scotia Landlords and Tenants in our Nova Scotia Rental Community

Let’s work together in 2018 for our mutual success. Let’s improve the rental industry and play a role in forming new policies. We invite tenants to join our community. If you are interested please email us at tenantexperiences@groupmail.com by January 15, 2018. Make sure you let us know about you and your renting experience and how you want to help (please note only those accepted with receive a reply)

Update on January 15, 2018 

Thank you for the overwhelming response of Tenants across Nova Scotia (and the region)! We now have filled the available positions for Nova Scotia (and regional) Tenant Community leaders. Keep watching for our next recruitment drive!.

Nova Scotia Landlords Take Control Of Your Rentals! It’s Time To Join the NSLA, Start Winning & Start Running Credit Checks To Find Great Tenants

man in suit showing a signboard with the different ranges of the credit score: excellent, good, fair and poor

 Take Action and Take Control Of Your Rental Business! Complaining About The System Won’t Help

Nova Scotia Landlords Need To Start Making Credit Checks Part of Your Tenant Screening System

A Smart, Inexpensive Invest Can Save you Thousands of Dollars and Months of Stress Down the Road!

We keep hearing about landlords facing stress and severe financial loss when they rent to bad tenants. It’s almost a never ending story and it goes like this.

Good Trusting Landlords

Good landlords have a nice, well-maintained property for rent. Being good, honest hard-working people and offering a terrific rental, the landlords put up the property for rent. They put up ads in the local paper or online and look forward to potential replies.

Want To Find Good Tenants ASAP To Cover Costs (especially the mortgage!)

As they are rental property investors, they are also eager to get the property rented as soon as possible.

After all, they aren’t a multi-million dollar corporation they are just normal hard working people with plan for a good future.  Small residential landlords have jobs and have families. They also usually have mortgages on their income property.

They hope they can find a good tenant fast who will help them cover their mortgage and maybe even provide a little bit of cash-flow each month. This extra money will help with things like minor repairs in the property and replacing things the tenants want replaced.

Landlords Have Honest and Positive Intentions

Many small landlords were renters themselves not that long ago.

And many have friends, co-workers and relatives who are tenants and are great tenants! These landlords are good, decent people and have put a great rental property on the market for good, decent tenants to rent.

Nova Scotia landlords want a win-win situation with themselves being great landlords and hoping to find great renters.  

Landlords See The Best in People, and the Best in Potential Tenants

Because they or their friends or relatives rent, they expect all tenants to be good people who pay their rent on time and respect the landlord and the rental property.

Landlords Are Trusting

Being good people landlords see the best in people. So when tenants want to rent from them most Nova Scotia landlords trust them and trust they will pay the rent on time and be good renters.

After all, when they used to be tenants they paid the rent on time and respected the landlord and the rental property.

Landlords Get Burned

In so many cases we have seen landlords follow this pattern…and get burned! Just like what happens to Ontario Landlords.

We see this over and over in the news.

For example we see this in Global News report GLOBAL NEWS HEADLINE: Hacket’s Cove Landlord Says the Residential Tenancies Program Isn’t Helping Him

In this story a tenant didn’t pay rent for months. The landlord found the system failed him. To get the tenant out he decided to sell the property!

Landlords Can Protect Ourselves

We’re landlords too. We know landlords who got burned and sell and look to invest in other places including Florida and in Ontario to become a Newmarket landlord or even just give up completely.

Make Credit Checks Part of Your Tenant Screening System

Landlords can join the Nova Scotia Landlords Association for a low one tie registration fee. This comes with lots of services including the ability to run premium credit checks very inexpensively.

Invest In Rental Business and Your Future Instead of Whining About the System

Instead of whining the system isn’t fair (reality check: it isn’t fair!) become pro-active an protect your rental business. You can join the Nova Scotia Landlords Association and begin to run credit check for a very low fee.

Credit checks tell you “who you are really renting to” and help you find great tenants (and avoid the liars and scammers out there).

Imagine If Every Landlord Ran A Tenant Credit Check

This would mean good tenants would have lots of great choices and the bad tenants out there would be out of luck. It would mean Nova Scotia landlords would have a fair playing field and there would be lots of great housing for tenants.

Nova Scotia landlords there are lots of terrific tenants out there who want to rent from you.

The problem is only one bad tenant can cause so much financial grief and even leads some people to get out of the business. With careful tenant screening you protect yourself and also help all the good tenants out there who are looking for a great rental property and a great landlord.

Nova Scotia Landlords Allowable Rent Increase 2016 for Land Lease Communities

Nova Scotia landlords rent increase guide for 2016

Nova Scotia Landlords Can Raise the Rent 1.5% in 2016 for a Land Lease Community

Successful and experienced Nova Scotia landlords know how important it is to rent out well-maintained properties. If you have a nice and safe rental property you will attract more good tenants and avoid the “pro tenants” out there who can destroy your rental and end up costing you thousands of dollars in lost rent and damages.

Of course, maintenance and property improvements are not cheap. And the reality is costs are rising. This is why it’s important for landlords to make sure the rent you are getting is increased each year to help you cover your costs.

Nova Scotia Landlords Can Raise the Rent 1.5% in 2016 for Land Lease Communities

Every year the government publishes how much landlords can raise the rent in the coming year. This is called the AARIA (Annual Allowable Rent Increase Guideline). In 2016 you can only raise the rent by 1.5%  Will this cover your additional costs?

Are You Going To Raise the Rent This Year?

If you own a single family home, condo or multiplex are you going to raise the rent this year?  If so, how much will you raise the rent?

Nova Scotia & PEI Tenant Screening: Tenant Credit Checks

Nova Scotia Tenant Screening Tenant Credit Checks and Tenant Criminal Checks

Landlords in our region are facing lots of challenges these days.

And while we want to discuss issues such as low rent increases the media continues to attack landlords.

After all, we are easy targets and easy for the media to define.

Another Landlord Is Trouble

According to a report on CBC News, landlord Lee Cowan of O’Leary says her rental unit has been trashed.

The landlady say when her tenants not only trashed her nice 3-bedroom property they moved out without proper notice….they didn’t even tell her!

What Damages Did The Tenants Do?

 A lot.

The landlady said the damages included:

– Appliances destroyed

– Basement was flooded and now smells horrible and has damaged the enter unit

– Cabinets have been ruined

– Drywall has been destroyed all over

Landlords and Facebook

Cowan has posted her story on Facebook and received a lot of positive replies.

Positive Replies and Support Are Not Enough

“I have gotten thousands of responses,” she said.

“To say thank you to these people is not a big enough word. I can’t think of a big enough word to say how many people have said, ‘We care.

We don’t know you but we care.’ They’re offering me all this support. 

They’re kind, caring people. Maybe they’ll help change the system a bit, so this doesn’t happen to somebody else.”

But no financial support and no answers!

Tenant Screening

These types of terrible stories are becoming more and more common in our region.

We used to think “Oh, those bad tenants are only in Ontario or Quebec.”

Sadly that isn’t true now

As this story shows, landlords need to be careful who you rent to.

If you rent to the wrong tenants you could be out thousands of dollars.

You could be ruined financially?

What Can A Landlord Do To Avoid Bad Tenants?

Smart landlords will do proper tenant screening.

Cowan simply took the money and rented to these ‘tenants from hell.’

Being a landlord in 2013 requires more than just accepting month.

You need to do proper tenant screening, including credit checks.

 

Don’t be a landlord victim! Always do tenant credit checks and make sure you are renting to good tenants.

Nova Scotia Landlords: Find Good Tenants

 Nova Scotia landlords no tenants

Investors become landlords because we see a business opportunity.

People need nice places to live in and investing in rental property seems like a great industry to be part of.

You’ve read some people who became landlords and although it wasn’t easy they earned enough profits to consider themselves wealthy.

With their new financial freedom they could help out family members, pay for their kids’ university tuition and even take a trip or two.

Challenges for Nova Scotia Landlords

In past blogs we’ve discussed some of the challenges Nova Scotia landlords face.

One of the biggest challenges is what you face if you rent to bad tenants.

It used to be we thought all the worst tenants were in Ontario.

And they still are, as this Ottawa landlord can attest to.

Landlords all over Canada face the ‘bad tenant’ challenge, even Manitoba landlords face this challenge.

Bad Tenants In Nova Scotia

We wrote before about what happened to small landlord Lee Cowan.

She’s the landlord who rented to a group of tenants and after they moved out (without proper legal notice) she found they had trashed the place including:

– Appliances destroyed

– Basement was flooded and now smells horrible and has damaged the enter unit

– Cabinets have been ruined

– Drywall has been destroyed all over

Lack of Tenants

Another problem landlords in our area face is something that isn’t common in other areas of Canada, even places like Manitoba.

It’s a lack of good tenants.

As a recent CBC News report illustrated landlords can find enough renters to fill their properties.

Some landlords are even offering move theaters and gyms where tenants can work out in their rental buildings.

And get ready for this…some landlords are offering tenants free TVs, yoga, rebates from local dentists and even Apple Ipads if you rent from them.

Landlords in Nova Scotia, PEI and Elsewhere in the Region

Have you found good tenants for your rental properties?

What do you think will happen in 2015?

Discuss this in the Nova Scotia Landlords Forum

P.E.I. Landlords Can Raise the Rent by 2% in 2014

P.E.I. Landlords Rent Increase 2014

 

Good news for P.E.I. landlords.

This is especially important with all the bad news for landlords we’ve seen over the past year in the region.

The Island Regulatory and Appeals Commission (also known as IRAC)  had meetings on whether or not there should be a rent increase and, if so, what the allowable rent increase should be.

In its report, IRAC said it received eight submissions from tenants, one from a landlord and one from anti-poverty group Alert.

According to the Guardian website starting Jan. 1, 2014, landlords will be allowed to increase rent for heated premises by two per cent, while rent for unheated premises and mobile homes in trailer parks can go up by one per cent.

How does that compare to other provinces? Well according to the Ontario Landlords AssociationOntario landlords can raise the rent 0.8% in 2014.

In its report on the increases, IRAC said it considered submissions from the public, the vacancy rates in P.E.I., the province’s economic outlook, increases in other provinces, consumer price index forecasts and previous allowed rent increases.

Although IRAC approved an increase, that doesn’t necessarily mean rent will go up the full amount or at all because it is at the landlord’s discretion, as long as they don’t go above the maximum allowed.

Among the concerns tenants raised were the negative effects of a rent increase on people with fixed incomes, above average construction of new rental units and the negative effects an increase would have on students.

IRAC has allowed rent increases every year for the last 10 years, including in 2013 when landlords were able to raise it by as much as five per cent for heated premises and three per cent for unheated.

The report showed rents went up in Charlottetown for 2013 where the average for a two-bedroom unit reached $831 compared to $797 in 2012.

Summerside’s average was $697 in 2013 compared to $669 last year.

That was despite an overall vacancy rate of 7.8 per cent across the province, which was up from 4.8 per cent in 2012.

While IRAC found property taxes are expected to be within the range of consumer price index increases and electricity rate increases will be stable for several years, heating oil prices 35 per cent over the past four years.

To Discuss This And Other Landlord Issues Go To the Canada Landlords Forum!

Prince Edward Island Landlords Can Raise the Rent By 2.0% in 2014

oct 1 trashed

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/prince-edward-island/trashed-rental-home-dismays-landlord-1.1861885

A woman in western P.E.I. says she’s facing financial ruin as a result of renting out her house.

O’Leary resident Lee Cowan told CBC News tenants trashed her three-bedroom home then moved out last month without telling her.

Lee Cowan

Lee Cowan surveys the damage done in the kitchen and dining room in her O’Leary home. (CBC)

She said the basement of the house was flooded, drywall is torn off walls, and cabinets and appliances are ruined. The damage has been reported to police.

Cowan said insurance won’t cover all the damage, but since posting photos on Facebook she has been overwhelmed by support.

“I have gotten thousands of responses,” she said.

“To say thank you to these people is not a big enough word. I can’t think of a big enough word to say how many people have said, ‘We care. We don’t know you but we care.’ They’re offering me all this support. They’re kind, caring people. Maybe they’ll help change the system a bit, so this doesn’t happen to somebody else.”

Insurance adjustors are still tallying the cost of repairing damage to the home. Cowan is looking for legal advice on what to do next.

http://www.ngnews.ca/Community/2013-08-28/article-3367804/Do-I-dare-rent-my-house/1

 

http://www.ngnews.ca/Community/2013-08-28/article-3367804/Do-I-dare-rent-my-house/1

Sept 1 Ipad

 

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/prince-edward-island/story/2013/08/27/pei-ipad-mini-landlord-tenants.html

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